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New Head Coach Search - 2021 Edition


GoZips86
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3 hours ago, zipsoutsider said:

This 》

https://twitter.com/FootballScoop/status/1456252393490898945

@FootballScoop: Consecutive head coaches fired by Akron:

Tom Arth 
Terry Bowden
Rob Ianello
JD Brookhart
Lee Owens
Gerry Faust

Perhaps, just perhaps, the University needs to rethink their commitment to football 

https://t.co/fzQOCTYHyS

Isn’t that why Huggins left.  
 

I mean it was inevitable but committing to FB accelerated this 

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8 minutes ago, 94zipgrad said:

Do you really think a new AD’s 1st hire for a D1 football program is going to be a high school football coach.  I would think that is career suicide

 

Especially a high school coach with no D1 coaching experience 

The list of guys that went from being a high school head coach to a college head coach, let alone an FBS coach, is damn small.  The list of successful ones is even smaller.  The natural progression is high school coach- college position coach- coordinator- head coach- head coach FBS school.  

 

To Tyrrell's credit, he's brought more top D1 talent to Hoban than Arth has brought to UA. 

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3 hours ago, zipsoutsider said:

This 》

https://twitter.com/FootballScoop/status/1456252393490898945

@FootballScoop: Consecutive head coaches fired by Akron:

Tom Arth 
Terry Bowden
Rob Ianello
JD Brookhart
Lee Owens
Gerry Faust

Perhaps, just perhaps, the University needs to rethink their commitment to football 

https://t.co/fzQOCTYHyS

Look up the history of Clemson football coaches. 

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6 hours ago, zipsoutsider said:

I think so. Kids can take the authoritarian style if they know the coach is credible and cares about them.

 

Akron needs a coach who will not accept losing and inferior work ethic. Patterson strikes me as that kind of guy.

Hard for me to see a guy like Patterson tuned in to the Southwest jumping this far down in his comfort zone. Might work for a few years if he is willing. But, hard to see.

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Brian Polian

 

Product Description

In coaching vernacular, a relationship guy is someone who performs at their peak when they have meaningful relationships and bonds with the coaches they work with every day. In reality, this concept is not exclusive to athletics. All people have an inherent desire to be close to others. We are all relationship guys. Brian Polian has been coaching college football at the highest levels for over 20 plus years. He has traveled the country recruiting elite student-athletes and working with them on a daily basis in the highly competitive and pressure-filled world of college athletics. In that time, he has witnessed a dramatic shift in how best to effectively teach and develop young people. Generation Z is different from their predecessors and the failure to recognize that and to adjust will put any person that works with them at a disadvantage. In order to effectively teach or coach Generation Z, establishing and maintaining healthy relationships with them must be the first priority. We have to honor the relationship before we can honor the task. Coach Polian draws upon his experiences and reflects on relationships being the greatest rewards in life, why they are so important to young people, identifying the building blocks of relationships, and how to build better ones with Generation Z. He examines honestly on the dynamics of diversity in working with today s student-athletes. The book also provides simple but effective ways to guide the giving and receiving of feedback and reminders of some of the characteristics that make Generation Z so unique. Finally, some of his mentors and valued peers from across the coaching profession share their observations as to the importance of building relationships with students and athletes. This book is not just for members of the coaching community. It can serve as a resource for teachers, employers, and even parents; for anyone that works to help young people develop and grow.

Review

Brian Polian has grown up around football. As a young man, he saw it coached at the highest level in the NFL, and he has had a very successful coaching career himself for over 20 years. Being around so many excellent coaches have allowed Brian to understand that coaching starts with relationships. In this book, Coaching and Teaching Generation Z, he gives a great outline of how to successfully build relationships by fostering communication that is built on trust, respect, and love. This book will help anyone who is interested in leading a team, a business, or a family. --Tony Dungy: Superbowl Champion, Pro Football Hall of Fame Coach, Author and NBC Sports Analyst

Brian grew up around the game of football and wanted to coach since he was 14 years old. In this unique book, he makes a real contribution to the game and profession he loves so much. --Bill Polian: Former NFL Executive, Super Bowl Champion, and Member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame

As a former college athlete and also the parent of three children who were recruits, I have a unique perspective when it comes to the relationships between coaches and players. Having known Brian Polian since 2007 and observed his work with my own sons, I can tell you he practices what he preaches. There is great value in his thoughts on relating to Generation Z. I would not only recommend this book for coaches, but also for anyone working with this generation of young people. --Mike Golic: Former NFL Player and Current ESPN Analyst

About the Author

Brian Polian is a veteran coach in college football, having worked at the Div. I level for over 20 years. His stops as an assistant include Michigan State, Buffalo, Baylor, UCF, Stanford, Texas &M, and Notre Dame. He also served as the head coach at the University of Nevada, Reno, where he led the Wolf Pack to two bowl games in four seasons and unprecedented academic success. He is considered one of the top special teams' coordinators in college football. His units appear at or near the top of the national rankings multiple times throughout his career. ESPN.com, Rivals, and 247 have also recognized him as one of the top recruiters in the country at the conclusion of various recruiting cycles. He has served on the AFCA Ethics Committee and on the inaugural College Football Officials Competition Committee. He completed his undergraduate studies at John Carroll University and his graduate degree from Baylor University.

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3 minutes ago, Hilltopper said:

Brian Polian

 

Product Description

In coaching vernacular, a relationship guy is someone who performs at their peak when they have meaningful relationships and bonds with the coaches they work with every day. In reality, this concept is not exclusive to athletics. All people have an inherent desire to be close to others. We are all relationship guys. Brian Polian has been coaching college football at the highest levels for over 20 plus years. He has traveled the country recruiting elite student-athletes and working with them on a daily basis in the highly competitive and pressure-filled world of college athletics. In that time, he has witnessed a dramatic shift in how best to effectively teach and develop young people. Generation Z is different from their predecessors and the failure to recognize that and to adjust will put any person that works with them at a disadvantage. In order to effectively teach or coach Generation Z, establishing and maintaining healthy relationships with them must be the first priority. We have to honor the relationship before we can honor the task. Coach Polian draws upon his experiences and reflects on relationships being the greatest rewards in life, why they are so important to young people, identifying the building blocks of relationships, and how to build better ones with Generation Z. He examines honestly on the dynamics of diversity in working with today s student-athletes. The book also provides simple but effective ways to guide the giving and receiving of feedback and reminders of some of the characteristics that make Generation Z so unique. Finally, some of his mentors and valued peers from across the coaching profession share their observations as to the importance of building relationships with students and athletes. This book is not just for members of the coaching community. It can serve as a resource for teachers, employers, and even parents; for anyone that works to help young people develop and grow.

Review

Brian Polian has grown up around football. As a young man, he saw it coached at the highest level in the NFL, and he has had a very successful coaching career himself for over 20 years. Being around so many excellent coaches have allowed Brian to understand that coaching starts with relationships. In this book, Coaching and Teaching Generation Z, he gives a great outline of how to successfully build relationships by fostering communication that is built on trust, respect, and love. This book will help anyone who is interested in leading a team, a business, or a family. --Tony Dungy: Superbowl Champion, Pro Football Hall of Fame Coach, Author and NBC Sports Analyst

Brian grew up around the game of football and wanted to coach since he was 14 years old. In this unique book, he makes a real contribution to the game and profession he loves so much. --Bill Polian: Former NFL Executive, Super Bowl Champion, and Member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame

As a former college athlete and also the parent of three children who were recruits, I have a unique perspective when it comes to the relationships between coaches and players. Having known Brian Polian since 2007 and observed his work with my own sons, I can tell you he practices what he preaches. There is great value in his thoughts on relating to Generation Z. I would not only recommend this book for coaches, but also for anyone working with this generation of young people. --Mike Golic: Former NFL Player and Current ESPN Analyst

About the Author

Brian Polian is a veteran coach in college football, having worked at the Div. I level for over 20 years. His stops as an assistant include Michigan State, Buffalo, Baylor, UCF, Stanford, Texas &M, and Notre Dame. He also served as the head coach at the University of Nevada, Reno, where he led the Wolf Pack to two bowl games in four seasons and unprecedented academic success. He is considered one of the top special teams' coordinators in college football. His units appear at or near the top of the national rankings multiple times throughout his career. ESPN.com, Rivals, and 247 have also recognized him as one of the top recruiters in the country at the conclusion of various recruiting cycles. He has served on the AFCA Ethics Committee and on the inaugural College Football Officials Competition Committee. He completed his undergraduate studies at John Carroll University and his graduate degree from Baylor University.

Wow, another guy with ND ties. I'm shocked to see that..... not. 

 

This guy's resume is slightly better than what Arths will be in 20 years. 

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1 hour ago, 94zipgrad said:

Do you really think a new AD’s 1st hire for a D1 football program is going to be a high school football coach.  I would think that is career suicide

 

Especially a high school coach with no D1 coaching experience 

Absolutely not, I just found it amusing the Beacon Journal would mention a high school coach when BGSU is still digging themselves out of a grave with what they did haha.

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1 hour ago, Hilltopper said:

Brian Polian

 

Product Description

In coaching vernacular, a relationship guy is someone who performs at their peak when they have meaningful relationships and bonds with the coaches they work with every day. In reality, this concept is not exclusive to athletics. All people have an inherent desire to be close to others. We are all relationship guys. Brian Polian has been coaching college football at the highest levels for over 20 plus years. He has traveled the country recruiting elite student-athletes and working with them on a daily basis in the highly competitive and pressure-filled world of college athletics. In that time, he has witnessed a dramatic shift in how best to effectively teach and develop young people. Generation Z is different from their predecessors and the failure to recognize that and to adjust will put any person that works with them at a disadvantage. In order to effectively teach or coach Generation Z, establishing and maintaining healthy relationships with them must be the first priority. We have to honor the relationship before we can honor the task. Coach Polian draws upon his experiences and reflects on relationships being the greatest rewards in life, why they are so important to young people, identifying the building blocks of relationships, and how to build better ones with Generation Z. He examines honestly on the dynamics of diversity in working with today s student-athletes. The book also provides simple but effective ways to guide the giving and receiving of feedback and reminders of some of the characteristics that make Generation Z so unique. Finally, some of his mentors and valued peers from across the coaching profession share their observations as to the importance of building relationships with students and athletes. This book is not just for members of the coaching community. It can serve as a resource for teachers, employers, and even parents; for anyone that works to help young people develop and grow.

Review

Brian Polian has grown up around football. As a young man, he saw it coached at the highest level in the NFL, and he has had a very successful coaching career himself for over 20 years. Being around so many excellent coaches have allowed Brian to understand that coaching starts with relationships. In this book, Coaching and Teaching Generation Z, he gives a great outline of how to successfully build relationships by fostering communication that is built on trust, respect, and love. This book will help anyone who is interested in leading a team, a business, or a family. --Tony Dungy: Superbowl Champion, Pro Football Hall of Fame Coach, Author and NBC Sports Analyst

Brian grew up around the game of football and wanted to coach since he was 14 years old. In this unique book, he makes a real contribution to the game and profession he loves so much. --Bill Polian: Former NFL Executive, Super Bowl Champion, and Member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame

As a former college athlete and also the parent of three children who were recruits, I have a unique perspective when it comes to the relationships between coaches and players. Having known Brian Polian since 2007 and observed his work with my own sons, I can tell you he practices what he preaches. There is great value in his thoughts on relating to Generation Z. I would not only recommend this book for coaches, but also for anyone working with this generation of young people. --Mike Golic: Former NFL Player and Current ESPN Analyst

About the Author

Brian Polian is a veteran coach in college football, having worked at the Div. I level for over 20 years. His stops as an assistant include Michigan State, Buffalo, Baylor, UCF, Stanford, Texas &M, and Notre Dame. He also served as the head coach at the University of Nevada, Reno, where he led the Wolf Pack to two bowl games in four seasons and unprecedented academic success. He is considered one of the top special teams' coordinators in college football. His units appear at or near the top of the national rankings multiple times throughout his career. ESPN.com, Rivals, and 247 have also recognized him as one of the top recruiters in the country at the conclusion of various recruiting cycles. He has served on the AFCA Ethics Committee and on the inaugural College Football Officials Competition Committee. He completed his undergraduate studies at John Carroll University and his graduate degree from Baylor University.

Well liked "relationship guy" who went to John Carroll... 🤔  😉

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3 minutes ago, Blue & Gold said:

Well liked "relationship guy" who went to John Carroll... 🤔  😉

Don't forget the Notre Dame connection. The Catholic school connection seems to matter a lot around Akron for whatever reason. 

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1 hour ago, GP1 said:

Tony Alford. OSU running backs coach. A John Hunter with better current Midwest credibility. 

 

Bonus reason: Brother of the late Aaron Alford who coached early in the Brookhart years. A fantastic guy. 

He makes $618,000 at OSU... very little chance of getting canned, and will probably be bumped to a $ million within 3 yrs

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It will probably end up being somebody whose name hasn't been mentioned on this board.

 

The Akron job is a position that would appeal to someone with few other options to be college head coach. I hate to say that but its true. I assume it will be another "take a chance on someone without much of a track record and hope for the best" hire. 

Edited by you am i
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https://www.on3.com/news/akron-zips-job-linked-several-nfl-college-position-coaches-notre-dame-fighting-irish-green-bay-packers-ohio-state-buckeyes/amp/

 

Out of this article above, I want Akron to take a look at Iowa State OC Tom  Manning. He is from Youngstown Oh. Matt Campbell’s right hand man. Plus he knows the Mac as he coached with Campbell in Toledo. From his bio with Iowa State very involved with recruiting. Worth to take a look. 

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2 hours ago, akrzips2012 said:

https://www.on3.com/news/akron-zips-job-linked-several-nfl-college-position-coaches-notre-dame-fighting-irish-green-bay-packers-ohio-state-buckeyes/amp/

 

Out of this article above, I want Akron to take a look at Iowa State OC Tom  Manning. He is from Youngstown Oh. Matt Campbell’s right hand man. Plus he knows the Mac as he coached with Campbell in Toledo. From his bio with Iowa State very involved with recruiting. Worth to take a look. 

Tom Manning makes $925,000 at Iowa State .... he does not want to look at Akron

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2 hours ago, Blue & Gold said:

 

If Rodriguez can do enough to convince the Zips to hire him, he sure as hell deserves it. However, that would involved at least winning 2 of the 3 remaining games. I’m not sure Saban could do that with this roster.

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Oscar Rodriguez seems like a really good guy, but I don't think he's an option like the article suggests unless the Zips win out and they blow every opponent out or so. I think Guthrie wants to start fresh and hire his own guy to bring in their own guys who will be fresh faces to the program. Just my opinion. With this being a huge hire for Guthrie's want to continue to climb the ranks, I think he has his own plan that doesn't involve anything from the Arth era.

 

I, of course, can't say this factually though. I've been proven wrong many, many times in life when I've assumed. Haha. 

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2 minutes ago, GoZips86 said:

Oscar Rodriguez seems like a really good guy, but I don't think he's an option like the article suggests unless the Zips win out and they blow every opponent out or so. I think Guthrie wants to start fresh and hire his own guy to bring in their own guys who will be fresh faces to the program. Just my opinion. With this being a huge hire for Guthrie's want to continue to climb the ranks, I think he has his own plan that doesn't involve anything from the Arth era.

 

I, of course, can't say this factually though. I've been proven wrong many, many times in life when I've assumed. Haha. 

 

I would agree with you, but I also don't think Guthrie is ignoring any reasonable option.  This might be the most thorough search Akron has done.

 

Which, good.  It's needed.

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1 minute ago, exit322 said:

 

I would agree with you, but I also don't think Guthrie is ignoring any reasonable option.  This might be the most thorough search Akron has done.

 

Which, good.  It's needed.

 

That's a really solid point you make. It should be a thorough search too, for sure! I want to believe Guthrie is going to try his hardest to get this right, so you're right, he should look at anyone and everyone. Whoever is hired I am going to stand behind (well, besides a HS coach...) because I have a feeling Guthrie realizes how badly the program needs help and I am only going to put my faith in it. I can only assume this was a huge topic in his interviews for the job. 

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21 hours ago, zippy5 said:

I wouldn't have wanted Kehres two years ago for the same reason I wouldn't want Tyrell now. The jump to FBS from HS is too much I think. Kehres has been at a MAC program for two years now and has seemed to do fine, whether his performance merits a HC gig I'm not sure of, but he's recruited and coached at a good MAC school for two years now and knows what it takes. I wouldn't hate it. He clearly knows Xs and Os

Didn't Kehres just give up 52 points to Eastern Michigan?

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